Blog

22 Songs To Listen To While Writing

1. Sleeping With Ghosts-Placebo


Listen here: https://youtu.be/PC2MFz6n4u0

2. Valley Girls-Blackbear


Listen here: https://youtu.be/aTvREOcd2H0

3. Cloud-Elias


Listen here: https://youtu.be/TmjvB3eDTvQ

4. And Then You-Greg Laswell


Listen here: https://youtu.be/AJPwBCkg2ek

5. Gravity-Jamie Woon


Listen here: https://youtu.be/t7YPo3-QLD4

6. I’ll Be Good-Jaymes Young


Listen here: https://youtu.be/scd-uNNxgrU

7. american dream-LCD Soundsystem


Listen here: https://youtu.be/ML1MUKOJIIo

8. Perfect Day-Lou Reed


Listen here: https://youtu.be/9wxI4KK9ZYo

9. I Don’t Love You-My Chemical Romance


Listen here: https://youtu.be/pyi0ZfuIIvo

10. Fake Plastic Trees-Radiohead


Listen here: https://youtu.be/n5h0qHwNrHk

11. Saturn-Sleeping At Last


Listen here: https://youtu.be/dzNvk80XY9s

12. Bloodstream-Stateless


Listen here: https://youtu.be/a8hD9SCMAQo

13. Angels On The Moon-Thriving Ivory


Listen here: https://youtu.be/S38-mjy5NtA

14. Truce-twenty one pilots


Listen here: https://youtu.be/eCeBNwBUkcI

15. The Night We Met-Lord Huron


Listen here: https://youtu.be/KtlgYxa6BMU

16. Island In The Sun-Weezer


Listen here: https://youtu.be/erG5rgNYSdk

17. Litost-X Ambassadors


Listen here: https://youtu.be/tGr_cyThHkc

Now for my go-to instrumentals:

18. Destiny of Love-Yiruma


Listen here: https://youtu.be/5yTTEskH6oE

19. River Flows in You-Yiruma 


Listen here: https://youtu.be/7maJOI3QMu0

20. Turning Page (Instrumental)-Sleeping At Last


Listen here: https://youtu.be/nMLiBVMvTh8

21. A Thousand Years-The Piano Guys


Listen here: https://youtu.be/gD9DjWw5jt4

22. Everyday-Carly Comando


Listen here: https://youtu.be/RCObXuAwCIA

Advertisements

The Biggest Hurdle In Writing & Tips On How To Deal With It

There are many components that pose a threat to writing.

Time, tools, ability.

These are problems, yes, but not the biggest one. You can make time, you can seek out the proper tools, you can improve your skills. The biggest hurdle in writing is sitting down in front of your instrument of creation and actually beginning to create.

There are many components that pose a threat to writing.

Time, tools, ability.

These are problems, yes, but not the biggest one. You can make time, you can seek out the proper tools, you can improve your skills. The biggest hurdle in writing is sitting down in front of your instrument of creation and actually beginning to create.

We’ve all struggled with this at some point or another, some more often than not. We are motivated to put in the work, yet we take a seat and proceed to stare at a blank screen for an unknown amount of time.

It’s not particularly that we don’t know how to start off or that we don’t have direction. It’s like running: the first few minutes are tough; you are warming up, you’re body is getting into the mindset of running, you are finding your flow. It takes a bit to find that “flow” every time you sit down to write.

Now there is a difference between warming up and writer’s block and you have to know this for your sanity because I guarantee that if you are sitting in front of your computer/notebook/etc. for hours telling yourself you are ‘warming up’, you’re going to end up pissed as hell.

This will happen to us all at some point, but afterwards you will know never make that mistake again.

Here is a list of things you can do to jump over that beginning hurdle:

1. Meditate.


Clear your mind for ten minutes, focus on your breathing and absorb the calm. Believe it or not, not thinking for a few beforehand is really going to be your friend, especially when you get to a point where you are questioning your whole project and you, the creator, doesn’t even know what the hell is going on anymore. Breathe, and you will succeed.

2. Listen to music.


Some writers are against this, but personally, I think it aids in soothing the mind and also blocking out any surrounding distractions. Ideally, you should choose songs that correspond to the intended mood of what you’re about to write. Though, if you don’t have a firm grasp on the mood yet, you can simply choose your favorites, songs that inspire you, or maybe a tune you’ve just heard today. Either way, find your peace within the music and then write away!

You can find a list of 22 songs to listen to while writing here.

3. Read 7 pages of a random book.


Why seven? Because six is too short and eight is too long. The book should be random because we all know how you can find inspiration in those random little places.

If you have previously read the selected book, it isn’t as random as it could be, no, but that doesn’t matter. If you aren’t actively reading said book and you pick it up and skim through pages 82-88 or pages 234-240 of a different book, you are an outsider on whatever is happening within these pages, and you might just find that little boost you were looking for.

4. Drink a glass of cold water.


Not warm water, not juice, soda, tea, coffee, and definitely not alcohol. Cold water. This will give you a nice boost of energy for the mission ahead. Us as writers tend to suck up caffeine like leeches. This means that nourishing our body with something like water rather than coffee before we begin writing is really going to make a difference.

5. Write. 


If all else fails to either work or appeal to you, just suck it up and start writing. The first few sentences (or paragraphs) may not be good, or even coherent, but when you finally get into your writing groove, that crappy warm-up section is going to be left in the dust of your following magifencent words.

Telling My Parents I Want To Be A Writer

Whenever someone would ask my what I wanted to be when I was a child, I would give them typical children’s answers. 

Veterinarian. Doctor. Teacher. 

I was never too keen on telling people what I actually dreamed of doing. It’s not that I couldn’t handle criticism or negative feedback. I simply hate unfinished things. Whether it be homework, a painting, a piece I’m writing, a book I’m reading, I hate when they are left half-done. 

Whenever someone would ask my what I wanted to be when I was a child, I would give them typical children’s answers.

Veterinarian. Doctor. Teacher.

I was never too keen on telling people what I actually dreamed of doing. It’s not that I couldn’t handle criticism or negative feedback. I simply hate unfinished things—whether it be homework, a painting, a piece I’m writing, a book I’m reading—I hate when they are left half-done.

Now you may be thinking what that has to do with me exposing my aspirations. Well, I have been writing for years, and I have never told anyone about what I was working on until it was done. You see, when you show people unfinished and unpolished work, it doesn’t matter if you warn them about it’s progress status beforehand, they will judge it as if it is complete.

I didn’t want to scream from the mountains that I wanted to be a writer when I didn’t have any proof that I could do it other than my sheer determination. Looking back on this now, those were such stupid thoughts to have. This was my dream. It’s what I was, still am, and always will be passionate about. I was not writing for anyone other than myself, so why was I so concerned with what others would think? As long as it made me happy, right?

Then came the time to start applying for colleges. I did. I told everyone I was going to become a lawyer; Criminal Defense, a real bigshot. Yeah, I kept that up for a while. I’m not a very good liar so whenever anyone asked me about going off to study law, my shoulders would drop a little (or alot) and I would suddenly be trying to escape the suffocating conversation.

The first time I’d told my parents I wanted to be a writer, I was hesitant because I am not a very good conversationalist, and that is clear as day. Still, I told them, assuming they’d forget by the end of the day. Well, years later when I am telling everyone I want to be a lawyer and then, like a flip of a switch, I say I don’t, nobody knows how to react.

I am questioned for weeks, pressured into making a decision (they claimed they weren’t trying to pressure me but you know how parents are, they want their children to have a solid plan). I say ‘TO HELL WITH PLANS, LET ME CHASE MY DREAMS’. My father ended up hearing about what I wanted to do (for the second time) in a roundabout way, not directly from my mouth.

To my surprise, he had remembered from the first time and even told me that he thought ‘writer’ suited me more than ‘lawyer’.

“You’ve always been a free spirit,” he said.

He wasn’t wrong. I couldn’t see myself studying law and then going on to right some wrongs (and wrong some rights), mind steadily dulling from the loss of my true dream. I saw myself being free and fluid within my words, finding my peace within the stories I’m crafting.

I am a firm believer that without dreams, we have nothing. What are we living for without a goal to fight toward? What are we without our dreams giving us hope, providing us happiness with every milestone? Who would I be without writing? It’s not something I’d like to think about.

Point is: Don’t ever be afraid to voice your ambitions in life. Don’t be afraid to chase. Don’t be afraid to fail, and most definitely, don’t be afraid to succeed.